Should You Use Coconut Oil for Acne?

Would you use coconut oil for acne or recommend it to someone else? Putting oil on top of already oily skin may not sound like a solution, but the more we learn about the properties of coconut oil the more reasonable the suggestion sounds.

If you or someone you love has ever suffered from acne you know how many different opinions there are about its cause and its cure. Almost everyone experiences some mild acne in their teenage years and young adulthood. When pores get plugged with the skin’s natural oils it can cause blackheads and pimples that form on the top layers of skin. These symptoms of “common acne” are usually mild and can be easily managed with proper hygiene and a healthy diet. Severe acne, also known as cystic acne, is described as swellings that develop below the skin. Cystic acne is caused when the infection of a clogged pore—the “pus” in a pimple—goes deep into the skin instead of coming to the surface. If the cyst breaks under the skin, the infection may spread and cause more breakouts.

Hormones, oily skin and some medical conditions can worsen episodes of acne. There are many topical creams and ointments that may help, but some are harsh, expensive and may cause unwanted side effects. As is often the case, the most natural approach may be the best.

Why Use Coconut Oil for Acne?

The infection contained within pimples is created when bacteria mixes with the dirt and oil that’s clogged in a pore. Anti-bacterial products are often recommended by dermatologists in the fight against acne. Lauric acid and capric acid are the naturally occurring chemicals in coconut oil that make it the kind of powerful anti-bacterial that can help prevent and lessen acne. As an added bonus, anti-inflammatory compounds in coconut oil help relieve the swelling and tenderness that often accompanies breakouts.

Unrefined coconut oil also contains Vitamin E and K—two potent antioxidants that promote healthy skin. They also help prevent and repair damage from scarring that may occur with severe acne. Coconut oil gently nourishes the skin to make it healthier overall. When you have acne, the desire to scrub your face vigorously and with strong cleansers is understandable, but not always the best idea. Many dermatologists recommend using products safe for sensitive skin. Harsh, drying cleansers can actually make acne worse because they upset the skin’s natural balance. When the skin is stripped of all its oil, it works overtime to produce more. Coconut oil is gentle enough to be used on babies. It will never dry or deplete the skin. Instead, natural coconut oil helps replenish the nutrients our skin needs to recover from breakouts faster.

Lastly, coconut oil is inexpensive, especially when compared to prescription and specialty cleaning “systems.” If it doesn’t work to help control your acne you haven’t wasted hundreds of dollars. In fact, you won’t have to waste any money—just move that jar of oil to the pantry and start cooking with it!

How to Use Coconut Oil for Acne Help

Begin with a high-quality pure coconut oil like Coco Treasure Unrefined Extra Virgin Organic Coconut Oil. Oil that’s been processed with heat or chemicals doesn’t contain the healthful ingredients needed to fight acne and keep your skin healthy.

After cleansing, place a small amount of coconut oil—no more than 1/8 teaspoon—and rub it between your palms. The oil will quickly melt; then you can easily apply it to your face as you would any other moisturizer. If the oil isn’t quickly absorbed into your skin, you’ve used too much! Simply dab a little off with a tissue if this happens. After a few tries, you’ll discover the exact right amount for you. When properly moisturized, your skin will feel soft and supple, never slick or oily. Apply coconut oil in the morning and before bedtime, or any other time you normally wash your face. Many people report seeing clearer, healthier-looking skin in as little as a few days. You may not notice results that quickly, but don’t give up. Try coconut oil for acne control for at least six weeks before deciding if it’s right for you.